Honoring 40 Faces of The Prouty

For our landmark anniversary year, we are excited to honor 40 Faces of The Prouty: a group of 40 participants, supporters, patients, survivors, clinicians, researchers, volunteers, and more who help make a difference through their involvement with The Prouty. The Prouty community is immense and our 40 Faces are a small representation of all those whose massive passion-driven efforts help to end cancer.

Patients, family, and friends are invited to stop by our outdoor pedestrian walkway display around Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (Lebanon, NH) honoring our 40 Faces of The Prouty June 1-July 10, 2021. Walk the 1.2 mile loop when it works for you and read inspirational signs about why we Prouty and how it makes a difference.

Please join us in celebrating this special group of inspiring individuals!

The Horsch Family
Ultimate, Walker, Cyclist, Golfer, Volunteer

Horsch Family

The Horsch Family
Ultimate, Walker, Cyclist, Golfer, Volunteer

Words from Lisa Horsch Clark: We’ve been in involved from the very beginning—in honor of our beloved family member Audrey Prouty, my aunt, for whom the four nurses originally rode their bicycles for through the White Mountains of NH and started The Prouty. Audrey was one of seven kids in the family—Bill, Audrey, Bob, Ginny, Art, Judy, and Nancy. When she passed away, one way the family dealt with the sadness was to participate in The Prouty every year.

The Prouty is and always has been an annual event for our family. We love being together and participating on team Audrey’s Family Tree, seeing our Prouty friends, telling people about Audrey and her journey, visiting with the original nurses, raising money for cancer research and care—it is the whole package for us.

It is unclear if we will ever “cure” cancer, but we believe people will live longer and have more comfortable lives the more research is done. I think about my uncle in the last years of his life being pushed in a wheelchair by his “little” brother. Both were in their nineties—that’s going to be me too with my family. We plan to continue their dedication and steadfast support for future generations.

We Prouty for Audrey, our family members who have had cancer, our friends and loved ones—each year we add new people. It is a way to honor them while raising money for a great institution doing important life-saving work.

Josie Harper
Survivor, Walker

Josie Harper

Josie Harper
Survivor, Walker

I Prouty to raise money for research and care at the Norris Cotton Cancer Center, and to honor those we love and have lost, in hopes there will be more of those who beat this horrible disease. My first Prouty was in 2005 when my partner, Michelle was first diagnosed with cancer. Years after losing Michelle, I faced my own cancer journey. It is not easy regardless, but I think watching a loved one who is ill may be more difficult than going through it one’s self.

I was proud to get involved with The Prouty and help support the Cancer Center. The care Michelle received, particularly by Dr. Gary Schwartz, was compassionate and personal—it is always impactful to see him at The Prouty and I am thrilled to learn that he is also being honored as part of the 40th year of this wonderful event.

My favorite part of The Prouty is the coming together of this incredible community for a common cause. The passion in the community for healthier futures is inspiring and brings hope. After years of coaching Dartmouth athletes, I have long been aware of the power of teamwork to make things happen. There is no team like the collective team of volunteers, participants, staff and others who have come together for The Prouty in the last 40 years for cancer patients worldwide.

Lisa Wesinger, RN, Wayne Shontz, & Family
Indoor Prouty, NCCC RN, Walker

Lisa Wesinger, RN, Wayne Shontz, and family

Lisa Wesinger, RN, Wayne Shontz, & Family
Indoor Prouty, NCCC RN, Walker

Words from Lisa Wesinger: I Prouty for patient services, which are essential to healing the mind, body, and soul of a person living with a cancer diagnosis. I’ve been a blood and marrow stem cell transplant nurse for over 20 years—caring for these patients and their families has been my passion. I Prouty for all of them. I Prouty for my dad and his brothers who lost their lives to cancer. I Prouty for my friends and family members battling cancer.

Our first Prouty was in 1998 after starting work at DHMC. I pulled my kids in a wagon through the neighborhoods of Hanover, NH, with my colleagues and their children. When the Indoor Prouty started 15 years ago for cancer patients, I signed up to work on Prouty Day. I found great pleasure in cheerleading my patients to get up and go in the morning so we could enjoy the festivities. This was their celebration!

I led the Indoor Prouty from 2016 to 2020. My daughters, Maria and Gabby, volunteered for the Indoor Prouty with their 4H group and then later Gabby became my Indoor Prouty assistant and Maria went on to work as a Prouty Intern. My husband Wayne is a fine craftsman who I could always count on to donate a handcrafted piece of furniture for our fundraising efforts. In 2019 we brought the music outdoors with three bands made up of cancer survivors and their friends. Patients, caregivers, family members of patients we have lost often come back on Prouty Day to participate in the celebration.

My favorite part of The Prouty is the camaraderie between health care professionals, hospital staff, patients, caregivers, families, and friends at the Indoor Prouty—it is priceless to see a person facing a cancer diagnosis feel like a normal human being, if only for a few hours.

David Lemal
Cyclist

David Lemal

David Lemal
Cyclist

I Prouty in honor of my wonderful wife, Lee, who passed away from lung cancer in May 2015.

I first got involved in the early Prouty days, back in 1987, when my 21-year-old daughter, Marielle, and I decided to ride our bicycles across the continent. As part of my training for that challenge, I rode 100 miles in a Prouty that was rudimentary by comparison with what the event has become. Later that summer, Marielle and I dipped our bikes in the Pacific Ocean in Lincoln City, OR, and rode ~3,400 miles to Portsmouth, NH, in 30 days. My daughter continued to ride, but I hung up my bike and hardly rode it for almost 30 years.

After I lost Lee, it occurred to me 2-3 weeks before The Prouty that year that I should ride the 100 miles again to honor her and raise funds for the place that had cared for her so well. So I emailed close to a hundred family members, friends, and acquaintances asking for support. After dusting off my old 10-speed bike and setting out to train, I discovered at age 81 to my chagrin that I could no longer climb hills the way I used to. At nearly the last minute, I rented a bike with lots more gears and successfully completed the century ride.

The following year Marielle joined me and we did the 100 miles together. Since then I have ridden solo each year, always with enthusiastic support from my other children: Corinne, Ark, and Anne-Marie.

For me, the best thing about The Prouty is the kindness of so many good people toward my Lee and me. Thanks to that remarkably loyal and generous cadre of donors, together with terrific matching help from the Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation, I have raised more than $130,000 so far for the Cancer Center. I like to believe Lee would be pleased.

Patty Carney, PhD
Survivor, Ultimate, Cyclist, Walker

Dorothy Byrne

Patty Carney, PhD
Survivor, Ultimate, Cyclist, Walker

Audrey Prouty was fearless. Taking care of her, especially as a brand new nurse (I was 22), was inspirational. She tackled her battle with ovarian cancer with such courage, which is something I'll never forget. Audrey was a cyclist herself and as she neared the end of her journey, four of us (her nurses) decided to ride 100 miles through the White Mountains in her honor. Audrey was excited to hear about our plans, always giving us hugs when she was in the hospital, but she passed away on July 7, the birthday of both Heather Adams and myself. None of the four of us had ever ridden a century (100 miles), but with her husband as our SAG wagon, we did it! Our goal was to raise $2,000 in 1982 in memory of Audrey at the Audrey Prouty Memorial Century ride, and we ended up raising $4,000. Each of the following years we set larger goals to increase participation and raise more funds, and thus the Prouty grew. It is remarkable to see what it has become—that it plays such an important role in the lives of so many people.

As a nurse at the Cancer Center, I was fortunate to see the compassion and care first hand at such a special place. Seeing and being part of the research inspired my own graduate studies—I was nurtured by the researchers at NCCC, and through their encouragement went on to get my PhD in public health and community medicine. I served as associate research director for population research at Oregon Health and Science University for seven years and my own research has focused on cancer screening/early detection and prevention, especially in underserved communities. I love science and the hope that it brings for healthier futures.

The Prouty is not just an event—it is a celebration of life, love, and wellness. The event brings the community together and surrounds everyone with hope for care and cures. Everyone, I think, knows someone just like Audrey Prouty, which is why the event has been enduring and successful: participating with passionate people and telling stories of loved ones. That is why The Prouty works—the Prouty surrounds us with hope.

Dorothy Byrne
Community Leader

Dorothy Byrne

Dorothy Byrne
Community Leader

I’m proud to support The Prouty and the fundraising efforts of the community. The event has become a vital part of community life in the Upper Valley uniting passionate individuals who want to make a difference.

I was first introduced to The Prouty in a meeting with Jean Brown, former Friends of NCCC executive director, and the rest is history. My youngest son had battled cancer for four years so I was very familiar with the protocols, the ups and downs of treatments, the disappointments, and the constant effort to remain hopeful. Fortunately, he is alive and well and healthy. In the meantime, my husband was diagnosed with the disease. Cancer treatments remained part of our life for many years until his death.

Watching the dedication of those involved in The Prouty has been an inspiration. The fact that it has united the community in such a way is a plus. It was not difficult to lend my early support and I will continue to do so with gratitude to all who participate.

Josie Hatfield, The Hatfield Family & Team Josie
Survivor

Josie Hatfield

Josie Hatfield, The Hatfield Family & Team Josie
Survivor

Words from Josie’s mom, Amalia Myers: We Prouty for our daughter, Josie. Josie was suddenly diagnosed at age 9 with leukemia in January this year. Although her prognosis is extremely hopeful, it turned our lives upside down. It also made us step back and look at life through different lenses. Things that seemed important and urgent were suddenly put on the back burner.

When we heard the words “Josie has Leukemia” our whole focus became conquering this terrible disease. Not only for Josie, but for all patients who are going through the same battle. We turned our focus on raising awareness in our community through The Prouty and Friends of NCCC events to help raise important funds that drive science forward. The community continues to rally around Josie’s journey, and all the support gives us strength and comfort.

The best part of The Prouty has been the smile Josie gets on her face whenever we show her a picture, email, or social media post about Team Josie. The support truly makes a difference to Josie and we want to carry that forward.

We Prouty because our daughter’s life is in the hands of Norris Cotton Cancer Center and we couldn’t be more content with her care. Let’s give, get involved, and spread awareness so that present and future children and adults, like Josie, have a fighting chance. Team Josie! Josie Strong!

Gary Schwartz, MD
NCCC Physician & Researcher, Volunteer, Walker

Gary Schwartz, MD

Gary Schwartz, MD
NCCC Physician & Researcher, Volunteer, Walker

I Prouty for my father and for my patients. My father dropped out of college and volunteered for the Army on the first day of World War II. He served in the Army Air Force for three years, was awarded several commendations, and was wounded in battle. The tobacco companies donated cigarettes to the military to be given away to our soldiers and he came back from the war with an addiction to nicotine. He subsequently smoked two packs of cigarettes daily for 35 years, until his diagnosis with lung cancer at the age of 57. He lost his battle two years later, when I was 22 years old, and the memory of him at the end of his life is seared into my brain. I have always tried to attend to my patients with the same concern and attention that I wanted for my father 40 years ago.

My first Prouty was in 2001, nearly a year after I started working at Norris Cotton Cancer Center. I was assigned the SAG station at Rope Ferry, and my shift lasted from 5 9 a.m. I loaded my car with cases of sports drinks, granola bars, and fresh fruit at 4:30 a.m. (because I did not want to be late!), and I drove the 1,000 feet from the medical school to Rope Ferry, where I unloaded my car and waited, and waited, and waited. I think a total of three people came by during my shift—The Prouty has gotten much bigger since then!

My favorite part of The Prouty is meeting my patients and thanking them personally for participating and supporting the work I do every day. Last year it was my turn to see the inpatients with cancer on Prouty weekend at the hospital, so I visited them in my Prouty t-shirt. We Prouty for our patients.

Arti Gaur, PhD
NCCC Researcher, Walker

Arti Gaur, PhD

Arti Gaur, PhD
NCCC Researcher

I'm in love with what I do. I get goosebumps when I think about what I do everyday as a cancer researcher and that I get to do it. I have a passion for digging deeper and asking questions. I truly want to solve the mysteries and find a cure.

As a little kid I was introduced to the field of immunology through my older brother (and his books), and I decided that was my future. It wasn't at first as I was a dancer, but immunology drew me in and it became my career. A few years into my work I lost my mom to cancer and that was when my work took on new meaning.

One of the biggest hurdles that researchers face is communication, which I've seen from day one in science. We haven't been taught to communicate our research, and hence people around us don't know what we are going through. We work in our lab and do our experiments, but no one really knows what we are working on. The Prouty helps to overcome this hurdle and helps us communicate what we are doing to the community by helping share our progress, our hurdles, and even our failures. It all brings awareness and through awareness comes more funding to fuel our work.

The Prouty makes it possible. It is simply incredible what the community and the Friends of Norris Cotton Cancer Center help to do. The Prouty gives scientists the funds they need to kickstart their work and their new idea. I have a fire in my belly to keep going, keep asking questions, keep searching for answers. It is what research is all about—it is about hope.

Jane & Peter McLaughlin
Ultimate, Cyclist, Volunteer

Jane and Peter McLaughlin

Jane & Peter McLaughlin
Ultimate, Cyclist, Volunteer

Words from Jane: I Prouty for my mom, Carol Kitchel, who was treated at Norris Cotton Cancer Center for brain cancer, but died several months after her diagnosis. Her experience of committed care marked my deepening commitment to The Prouty. One of my most treasured memories was of my mom in July 2008 cutting yellow ribbons at the Prouty and distributing them to participants. She died the next month. My first Ultimate was 2009, the year after she died. The ride was challenging—I often separated from my starting group, and rode many miles on my own. However, I was never lonely, because I felt like I spent the day with my mom. All of my Prouty miles are dedicated to my mom.

We got involved in with The Prouty in 2006 when our son, Jake, wanted to ride a century, and he started talking about the event. I rode the 50 (my longest ride ever) and my two sons rode their first centuries. We haven't missed a Prouty since.

Our favorite part of The Prouty is being on the road with thousands of people who are entirely connected and committed to the event. Most poignantly, this includes survivors and patients actively in treatment. I am humbled by the fortitude and resilience on display on the roads!

It is spectacular the way the entire community rallies around The Prouty. We are always awed by the caring spirit displayed by volunteers, participants, spectators, and staff. It is a privilege to be a part of this and a cog in The Prouty wheel helping motivate other participants to raise more money.

Yoli Sanchez, PhD, Craig Tomlinson, PhD, & Sofia Tomlinson-Sanchez
NCCC Researcher, Walker, Volunteer

Yoli Sanchez, PhD, Craig Tomlinson, PhD, & Sofia Tomlinson-Sanchez

Yoli Sanchez, PhD, Craig Tomlinson, PhD, & Sofia Tomlinson-Sanchez
NCCC Researcher, Walker, Volunteer

Words from Yoli Sanchez, PhD: We Prouty to honor friends and loved ones who are cancer patients, survivors, or passed away from cancer. During our walk and bike ride we carry yellow ribbons with the names of loved ones who we are honoring that day, including the names of the loved ones that our supporters wrote on our donation wall. Cancer is personal and has impacted too many.

Craig and I first worked The Prouty in 2008 as volunteers coordinating traffic, but in 2009 it became a family event. With our Orford home right on the cycling route, our 17-month-old daughter, Sofia, and I cheered on Prouty cyclists from our driveway, while Craig directed traffic on the Orford Bridge. Since 2011 our family has walked the 5K wooded walk and Craig has cycled for the past three years on team Big Green Pazooie.

The Prouty is truly a magical day. As we drive down Route 10 to the event, we are surrounded by hundreds of cyclists of all ages on either side. Even though we witness this year after year, it remains an inspiring scene. I look forward to thanking participants every year at the Prouty and walking alongside them.

We Prouty because we want to share the process of cancer research discovery with the community—that the road is long and that it takes years of keeping our eye on the prize. I want to share the wonderful work coming out of Norris Cotton Cancer Center (NCCC), made possible because of Prouty support. By raising funds for research and patient support services, Prouty participants become members of our NCCC teams and family.

Andy Olanoff
Survivor, Ultimate, Cyclist, Ultimate Committee Volunteer

Andy Olanoff

Andy Olanoff
Survivor, Ultimate, Cyclist, Ultimate Committee Volunteer

My own survival with cancer roughly coincides with my Prouty involvement. I cannot complain that there is “no cure yet” for my cancer because new drugs have kept my cancer cells under control through quite a few cycles of treatments. At every appointment, I meet cancer patients whose cancers are much worse than mine. I Prouty for these individuals and all cancer patients.

In 1999, members of the Killington Pico Cycling club I was a part of decided to do a century ride in Hanover, NH called The Prouty and I joined them. I was happy that my registration fee was going to the Cancer Center, particularly after having had prostate surgery two years earlier, but when it came down to it, The Prouty meant I would be riding with a group interested in one thing: riding a hundred miles as fast as possible. I completed that century with a 20.1 mph pace. While I’m not able to ride that fast anymore, what matters now are the deeper values behind The Prouty: supporting the Cancer Center and cancer research, as well as my own desire to make a difference.

My favorite part of The Prouty is being on the starting line of a Prouty Ultimate right on the Dartmouth Green as the sun is rising. Then, arriving at the Mt Cube SAG and eating peanut butter and jelly sandwiches made by one of the campers. And finally, finishing a century ride, seeing Prouty friends I haven’t seen for a year.

Participating in The Prouty is the best I can do to help scientists and researchers do their work. Thanks to the unique arrangement between the hospital and graduate schools at Dartmouth, the Cancer Center is ranked sixth in innovation among all comprehensive cancer centers. It is a national leader in discovering applications of immunotherapy in treating and preventing cancer. This is just one reason I feel confident that our donations to its research and discoveries is the very best that I, and you, can do to help end cancer. We are making a difference.

Mary Chamberlin, MD
NCCC Physician & Researcher, Ultimate, Cyclist

Mary Chamberlin, MD

Mary Chamberlin, MD
NCCC Physician & Researcher, Ultimate, Cyclist

I Prouty for my patients here in the Upper Valley, our colleagues in cancer care around the world, and all of those touched and wounded by cancer, of which there are way too many.

My first Prouty was in 2010. I was inspired by Charlie Boswell, my children’s favorite teacher and former Prouty chair, who was riding 100 miles in honor of his father. My friends Julie Jensen, Maria Ogden, and I were spending a weekend on Nantucket in early May of that year and I said, “Let’s ride 100 miles this year!” They agreed, amazingly enough, and we were intimated by our own enthusiasm! Within six weeks we trained, recruited our friend Evie Lovett and our husbands, and had a great time.

I love being involved and now lead our team Dartmouth Without Borders. My favorite part of The Prouty is all the fantastic bike rides we do in a spectacular part of the country in a beautiful time of year, with really fun people.

I Prouty because I like to support an organization that is home-grown and close to the hearts of so many in our community. I know the funds raised go directly to patient programs that are vital to the health and recovery of our patients, and I know they go directly to our own scientists to advance research that will lead to more cures and longer lives. The Prouty indirectly benefits everyone being treated for cancer here and everywhere.

Carolyn & Peter Mertz
Cyclist

Carolyn & Peter Mertz

Carolyn & Peter Mertz
Cyclists

Words from Carolyn Mertz: We Prouty to support the Cancer Center. We believe in giving to support cancer research, but providing assistance to families really resonates with us. Patients and the families of cancer patients are under such stress, and supporting their journeys to ease the strain is really important. We also Prouty to be part of a community-based event that brings together people of all ages and capabilities. It has served as an entry to philanthropy for many participants, and we love seeing people begin lifelong journeys in giving.

We have lived on the Prouty bicycle route since 1995, but because of summer travel we never noticed Prouty Day. After supporting several friends’ participation, in 2011, I started cycling with them. I rode my first 50-mile Prouty in 2012, and have ridden the century every year since. Not one to be left behind, Peter bought a bike in 2013, and began riding his own 50-mile ride. We ride each year on team Global Forest Partners LP.

Our favorite part of The Prouty is the big day and the energy that is generated with hundreds of participants and wonderful volunteers who support the Cancer Center. Riding alongside survivors is the most humbling experience of all.

We Prouty for family members and friends we’ve lost to cancer and for many, many survivors, which fills us with great hope. We Prouty in memory of Peter’s brother, Bill, Nate Geurkink, Katy Gerke and Carol Kitchel. Some of the survivors that we ride for include Peter’s brother, John, Pecos, Gayle, Greg, and Erin. We ride for hope.

Barbara H. Jones
Cyclist

Barbara H. Jones

Barbara H. Jones
Cyclist

I Prouty for every person who has faced the personal struggle of fighting cancer. I also have had the opportunity to hear Dr. Steve Leach and other researchers talk about how these dollars can be leveraged to begin work on promising but unproven therapies. These discoveries can lead to amazing cancer breakthroughs which is inspirational.

I first participated in the Prouty in 1984, the one and only time I did 100 miles. I had agreed at the urging of S. John Stebbins to accompany him because he said “we could stop at any time.” I had never before biked farther than perhaps 5-10 miles so it really was a crazy thing to do, but both Jack and I ended up with strong unknown biking angels who rode alongside us, and saw that we made it the whole way. This was long before meaningful SAG stops!

My favorite part about the Prouty is the synergistic energy that multiplies and feeds into the shared joy of picking up gear, getting shirts and yellow ribbons, doing the biking and talking with fellow participants and bonding for an exceptionally worthwhile cause.

I Prouty for Jack Stebbins the man who “conned” me into doing my first and only 100-mile Prouty but for whom I am eternally grateful that he pushed me. Secondly, I Prouty for Merle Schotanus (pictured above) who was the most dedicated Prouty co-captain with me. Merle is no longer alive, but I know he will be with the Grantham Mountaineers for every turn of the pedal or step taken in this the 40th Prouty.

Bruce Parsons
Survivor, Ultimate, Cyclist, Prouty Executive Committee Volunteer, FNCCC Lebanon Board Member

Bruce Parsons

Bruce Parsons
Survivor, Ultimate, Cyclist, Prouty Executive Committee Volunteer, FNCCC Lebanon Board Member

Every year on my ride, I carry with me a photo or two of people I know currently facing cancer. I Prouty for them, my family, and for me.

I was diagnosed and treated at NCCC in 1981, 40 years ago, just as the four nurses decided to ride their bicycles through the White Mountains in honor of Audrey Prouty. My wife was treated at the Cancer Center in 2002. Cancer has impacted too many people in our lives.

My first Prouty was in 2005 when I rode the century with my oldest son who had just graduated high school. It was my first 100-mile ride and a friend told me not to worry because The Prouty century was the only ride he gained weight on due to just how good the riders were taken care of at the SAG stops! He wasn’t wrong.

My favorite part of the Prouty is twofold: First, the challenge to raise critical funds needed for the Cancer Center while trying to raise more than the year before; and second, the day of the event and the challenge of the ride itself. I Prouty because supporting cancer research and care has been a passion of mine since the 1980’s after my personal journey with cancer. The Prouty is a way for me to give back to the Cancer Center and support everyone I know who has had to deal with this disease. The more that scientists and researchers learn about this disease, the sooner it will be eliminated.

P. Jack Hoopes, DVM, PhD, Vicki Scheidt, DVM, and Mollie Hoopes
NCCC Physician & Researcher, Ultimate, Cyclist

P. Jack Hoopes, DVM, PhD, Vicki Scheidt, DVM, and Mollie Hoopes

P. Jack Hoopes, DVM, PhD, Vicki Scheidt, DVM, and Mollie Hoopes
NCCC Researcher, Ultimate, Cyclist

Words from Vicki Scheidt, DVM: We Prouty for patients and families, for the Cancer Center and the Upper Valley community, and for us. The Prouty has been an extremely important event and tie for our family. We have used it as a marker for how our family has lived and changed over the years. Getting ready and participating in The Prouty is a special part of our summer family activities and has become a family tradition just like the Christmas holidays. We simply love it.

We first got involved in 1988, after Jack joined Dartmouth as an assistant professor in the Medicine/Radiation Oncology Department. Being an endurance exercise person and working in cancer research made supporting the Cancer Center, through The Prouty, a fun and natural activity, especially for our family. Our daughter, Mollie even helped in the office as a Prouty intern to support the event. Each year we participate on team Scheidt-Hoopes. And Jack’s projects have received Prouty Pilot Awards at the Cancer Center, giving seed-funding to new ideas in cancer research. Without the Prouty and philanthropy, advancements in research wouldn’t be possible.

Our favorite part of The Prouty is seeing the passion of the overall community and the individuals. Seeing so many local businesses get involved and donate time and supplies to help make the event so successful. For us, the most amazing part of the Prouty are the 15-year-old kids who have little training and are riding on heavy mountain bikes 100 miles just to support a grandparent or other family member diagnosed with cancer (often riding for nine hours to complete 100 miles). It is that scenario that makes the Prouty so very special, so meaningful and so contagious.

Dan Wolf
Cyclist

Dan Wolf

Dan Wolf
Cyclist

The Prouty is one of New Hampshire’s greatest community events. I Prouty for those who have been affected by cancer, and for future generations so that they will live longer, healthier lives.

I first got involved with The Prouty in the mid-1980s. I had some friends who passed away from cancer and wanted to support their memory, and I had known Dr. Ross McIntyre, former director of the Norris Cotton Center Director for many years, and was later proud to serve on the Cancer Center’s Board of Advisors.

The mission of The Prouty became especially personal in 1988 when my beloved dad was diagnosed. Advancing cancer research and enabling the Patient and Family Support Services Program at the Cancer Center is our way of giving back in dad's memory. I love being involved with The Prouty from fundraising to riding. It is a family tradition—as I look forward to participating each summer with my daughter—with immense support from my wife Beverly.

My favorite part of The Prouty is pedaling north on Route 10 looking west to the Connecticut River and reflecting upon all those people who have been affected by cancer.

Mara and Richard Weissmann
Survivor, Ultimate, Cyclist, Walker

Mara and Richard Weissmann

Mara and Richard Weissmann
Survivor, Ultimate, Cyclist, Walker

Words from Mara Weissmann: We Prouty for those who came before us, those who will come after us, and those who battle cancer. We Prouty for their families who are caregivers. We Prouty to celebrate the survivors and honor those who have succumbed to cancer. And, after 28 years of Prouty’ing, we Prouty because we love the Cancer Center community and all those who support them.

We got involved with The Prouty in 1993 when my law partner, Rick Horsch (fellow 40 Faces honoree), invited us to join his family for The Prouty. After my beloved father passed away from esophageal cancer in 2007, The Prouty took on a whole new meaning for us. His passing was a devastating blow to my family and the Cancer Center team extended their open arms to my family for anything we may have needed in the care of my dad during his last 18 months. When I was diagnosed with a rare lymphoma in 2018, Dr. Erik Lansigan was enormously helpful in educating me on my disease and led me to his mentor, Dr. Francine Foss at Yale, near my home. I am forever grateful for his support, and I love seeing and cheering him on at The Prouty!

My favorite part of The Prouty is seeing all the participants on my walk who have a survivor bib on. I love that The Prouty has become a focus for community outreach and cancer prevention awareness. Finally, I love observing the spirit on that special day as others take pride in the participants’ achievements all in the name of raising money for cancer research, diagnosis, prevention, treatment and management.

Richard and I Prouty because we believe in the Cancer Center. NCCC is not like other major cancer centers in the country. It is in rural NH and provides cancer care to patients and their families in underserved communities. We are proud to be fundraisers for, and participants in, The Prouty so that we can do our part to help provide services to people suffering from cancer in these underserved communities.

The Rightmire Family
Ultimate, Rower, Walker, Cyclist

The Rightmire Family

The Rightmire Family
Ultimate, Rower, Walker, Cyclist

Words from Matt Rightmire: The Prouty is a lot of things for us: a family reunion, a motivator to get outside in the spring to make sure we are fit for July, and a way to catalyze support for an institution that exemplifies what we love about the Upper Valley. The Prouty is a way for us to focus a little time and mindshare honoring friends and family who have suffered from cancer—those who have recovered, those who didn’t, and won’t. I Prouty for my dad and for the compassionate care he received at NCCC during his cancer journey.

We first got involved after having returned to the Upper Valley in 2006, and ran into someone who was a longtime Prouty participant. He raved about the event being all that is special about the area—everyone linking arms to support the community we call home and doing so in a massively inclusive way. Our family got involved in various ways over the years, and Andy even helped as an intern for the Prouty one summer.

Our favorite part of The Prouty is the feast at the end of the day where we see a lot of folks from around town that we haven’t seen in a while. The Prouty draws from every part of our community: young, old, and every age in between; folks from the towns on both sides of the river; those with lifetime ties to the Cancer Center and others who are out to have a good day outside and help out a good cause along the way. It’s a wonderful portrait of everything that makes this community what it is.

Paul Guyre, PhD
NCCC Researcher, Cyclist, Rower

Paul Guyre, PhD

Paul Guyre, PhD
NCCC Researcher, Cyclist, Kayaker

I Prouty for brothers, other relatives, and family friends who died too young. We continue to participate in honor of many friends and family.

My first Prouty was in 1984. My wife, a nurse, heard about the first Prouty from her colleagues and my 8-year-old son, Matt, and I rode 25 miles. It always amazes us how the rest stops are filled with people who cheer us on. In the early days, people on the circle in front of the medical school rang bells to cheer our finish.

My favorite part of The Prouty are the downhills! And doing it with my wife and our group—Allan and the Munckettes beginning in 1987. Allan Munck was my mentor who died in April 2016. His favorite part was all the rest stops where he could fill his pockets with goodies. Fittingly, the Munckettes rode and then had his memorial service on Prouty Day 2016.

I Prouty because it is a fun and important way to support cancer research with friends. Research can help improve cancer treatment and save lives, and the Prouty community fuels seed-funding to scientists with new ideas and brings hope.

Patrick Maxfield
Survivor, Walker, Golfer, Volunteer

Patrick Maxfield

Patrick Maxfield
Survivor, Walker, Golfer, Volunteer

I Prouty to help all the patients, staff and families who have to battle cancer on a daily basis.

I started participating in the Prouty back in 2006. My oncologist, Dr. Elizabeth Bengtson, told me about the event, the community, and what it was all about—she was right. Duane and his family joined me in 2012 when Duane was diagnosed with lymphoma. Duane called me to share the bad news, and I quickly reassured him that he’d be just fine—the NCCC will take care of him just like they did when I had cancer. In 2013 Team Max-Field was formed. We continued to walk with our families, added golf to our Prouty agenda when it became a Prouty event, and then began volunteering in 2014. We’re all in.

My favorite part of The Prouty are the people—the participants, volunteers, and staff. They all have a story and are all amazing people dedicated to making a difference.

I am proud to Prouty to help cure cancer!

Duane Field
Survivor, Walker, Golfer, Volunteer

Duane Field

Duane Field
Survivor, Walker, Golfer, Volunteer

For whom do I Prouty is a loaded question with a loaded answer. Fortunately because of great fundraisers like the Prouty funding cancer research, Pat (Patrick Maxfield, fellow 40 Faces honoree) and I are still here. I Prouty for people I don’t know, and for friends and family members that have been through this. I Prouty for my brother-in-law Lee who was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer and now has inactive cancer. And this year, I Prouty in memory of my brother Scott, who just lost his battle with stage 4 lung cancer in February.

I started participating in the Prouty in 2012 after being diagnosed with lymphoma. My family joined Pat Maxfield’s team. The following year Team Max-Field was formed. Pat and I started to volunteer in 2014—we love it. The unity and what the Prouty represents is my favorite part—the hope that the community provides coming together.

We Prouty because we want to help cure cancer and raise funds to pay it forward. I was part of a trial study through Dr. Lansigan. I feel I was fortunate to be able to be part of it. We are still here because of fundraisers like The Prouty supporting life-saving research!

Rowan Carroll
Survivor, Rower, Volunteer

Rowan Carroll

Rowan Carroll
Survivor, Rower, Volunteer

I Prouty for everyone because cancer affects everyone. My nephew, at 4 years old, had a rare childhood cancer. He would not have had such an amazing outcome had it not been for institutions like our Cancer Center doing research and working towards treatments and cures. Twenty years ago I had malignant melanoma—the treatment for skin cancer is so advanced and has such positive outcome, it almost seems common place. One day we will be in a position where more cancers are this treatable, but that will only come with funds for research and support—this is why I Prouty.

I first got involved with The Prouty as a welcome volunteer for registration in the mid-2000’s. As soon as the idea of adding rowing to the Prouty came about, I worked on bringing it to life. Rowing has been a key piece of my life—the highlight being competing for Great Britain in the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney. Since 2011, when it was introduced, I’ve participated in the 20k row on the Connecticut River and on team UVRF-Lebanon Crew.

My favorite part of The Prouty is the joy, excitement, and team-ness of the celebration after the event. It is so great to see everyone coming together after they have completed their event, whether it is a walk in the woods, a 200-mile bike ride, a virtual adventure, or rowing with friends. Whatever people have done there is a joy and excitement after they have completed it that has an amazing energy and hope!

Doug and Leslie Lewis
Ultimate, Cyclist

Doug and Leslie Lewis

Doug and Leslie Lewis
Ultimate, Cyclist

We Prouty to honor the memory of Doug’s youngest brother Dale (Hoss) and the many others who have lost the battle with cancer, as well as to support those currently battling the disease.

Doug participated in his first Prouty in 2005 in support of Dale who was battling cancer and receiving treatments at NCCC. After Hoss passed in November of 2005 we formed Team Hoss in 2006. Over the past 15 years our incredible teammates have raised over $1.37M to support the Prouty. When you lose a beloved family member at a young and vibrant age (41), it is a severe emotional gut punch. Dale was clearly the backbone of our family being the youngest of 5 siblings. Our family, still 16 years later, struggles with the void his loss has created. However, participating in the Prouty over the years has softened the blow as we have developed hundreds of new relationships with many wonderful people. We participate annually, with Doug cycling the century or Ultimate and Leslie riding with our kids and grandchildren.

We Prouty to support research and patient services at NCCC and for the therapeutic benefit it offers for someone who has lost a loved one to cancer. The camaraderie at The Prouty shared with so many committed teammates and the many other amazing people in the community is inspirational.

Thomas Davis, MD
Survivor, NCCC Physician & Researcher, Indoor Prouty, Volunteer

Thomas Davis, MD

Thomas Davis, MD
Survivor, NCCC Physician & Researcher, Indoor Prouty, Volunteer

I Prouty for all of my patients, past, and future. I know how much good the Prouty funds do for our Cancer Center, from the perspectives of a physician/investigator and of a patient.

I first got involved in the early 2000s. At the time I was the director of the Heme/Onc Fellowship Program, and the Fellows and I organized a team, “Training Wheels”—it was a great bonding experience for the Fellows.

After riding for several Proutys, I found myself somehow always on call for Prouty day, and the inpatient cancer service kept me from riding. At the same time the nurses and staff of the inpatient unit organized the Indoor Prouty party for the patients in hospital. Instead of miles on a bike, patients have the opportunity to walk the circular path around the inpatient unit (40 laps = 1 mile!), complete with a SAG stop, costumes, and more. This fun event gives the patients a lift and a sense of participation in the ‘big’ Prouty.

One on-call Prouty day I happened to have my guitar with me, and the spirit of the event moved me to put on a pink party hat and sing that soul classic “Twenty-Five Miles To Go” complete with conga line of nurses. This began a musical tradition.

In 2018 I was diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome. I had to get several months of chemotherapy and then a bone marrow transplant. It so happened that I was hospitalized during the Prouty, and saw ‘up close and personal’ the importance of the science and support services made possible by the Prouty.

Kristine Karlson & Dave Stiger
Ultimate, Cyclist

Kristine Karlson & Dave Stiger

Kristine Karlson, MD & David Stiger
Ultimate, Cyclist

Initially, our motivation to Prouty was to go on a long bike ride with the energy and enthusiasm of a big event. As time has gone on and we have seen more of the good works of the Friends of Norris Cotton Cancer Center, we have continued to participate more out of conviction that this is something we can do to help the greater good.

When we moved to the Upper Valley over 20 years ago, The Prouty seemed to be the big summer cycling event that any cyclist should participate in, and we wanted to get involved. We’ve participated ever since—it is a key piece of our summer and we look forward to it every year.

Our favorite part of The Prouty is the friendly fundraising competition within our team, Team Hoss, as well as the camaraderie on the ride and the post-ride picnic. And in recent years, we’ve loved the Prouty on the dirt!

We Prouty for lots of people. Each of our families has been touched by cancer, as have friends. Too many people and we Prouty to change that.

Joel Smith
Survivor, Ultimate, Cyclist

Joel Smith

Joel Smith
Survivor, Ultimate, Cyclist

I Prouty because I’m grateful for the extraordinary compassionate care I received and continue to experience at the Cancer Center. I want to be sure that anyone who receives a cancer diagnosis has access to the same remarkable care that I received right here in NH.

I first got involved in 2006 when I saw a poster for The Prouty during a follow up appointment at NCCC. I had been biking to get back into shape, as running was just too much after chemotherapy, and The Prouty seemed like a good challenge and way to give back.

My favorite part of the Prouty is the whole atmosphere. The white tents, yellow ribbons, colorful balloons, and several thousand people coming together to send a message to cancer patients, the doctors, nurses, and researchers that says, “We’re here and we’ve got your back!”

I Prouty for those who have gone before us, my mom, and friends who left us way too soon—The Prouty is a great way to pay tribute to their legacy. I Prouty for all those who need encouragement and especially for the doctors, nurses, and researchers who give so much. To do the kind of work these people do requires a special personality, strength, and courage. The Prouty does so much more than raise money. It rekindles hope, it strengthens our resolve to take on the hundreds of diseases we know of as cancer, and it fills us with the courage to move forward.

Simone Russell
NCCC LNA, Indoor Prouty, Walker

Simone Russell

Simone Russell
NCCC LNA, Indoor Prouty, Walker

I Prouty for family members and friends I’ve lost and to those who are still with us fighting against this disease. I Prouty for my past, present, and future patients—all of whom teach me so much about life, love, family, friendship, perseverance, and gratitude. Their entire world has or will be rocked by a diagnosis of cancer, and somehow they still seem to find the strength within themselves to fight for life and hope.

My first Prouty was in 2005 with my 1 West coworkers. It was fun, and afterward we stopped by to say hello to the 1 West community in the hospital. That got me thinking—could we put on The Prouty for our 1 West community of patients? The following year we held the first Indoor Prouty with Cancer Center patients. I ran the Indoor Prouty until 2013 when I handed it off. In 2017, I started a 3K/Infusion Suite Indoor Prouty and so far it’s a success!

My favorite part of The Prouty is seeing the face of my patients when they get to 3K for their appointment and the happiness that the Indoor Prouty brings them. My heart is so full to be able to provide them one stress-free half day of fun celebrating them.

We at the Cancer Center are grateful for all that The Prouty offers to our patients, families, and for our education. Thanks to a Prouty grant, I am a certified hospice and palliative care assistant as well as a certified end of life doula.

Jeffrey Findeisen
Cyclist

Jeffrey Findeisen

Jeffrey Findeisen
Cyclist

I Prouty for my wife Kim, my father, my father-in-law, and way too many friends who are fighting cancer, have fought cancer, and to honor those who have lost the battle against cancer. Fundraising for the fight against cancer is the reason and motivation for why I Prouty.

In February 2015, I was wandering the halls of the DHMC waiting for my wife, Kim, to come out of the operating room where a needle biopsy was being done on a tumor in her vertebrae. We would soon find out it was metastatic breast cancer. I was obviously concerned, but also very frustrated—I wanted to reach into my tool box and fix whatever was wrong. In the hospital, I came across The Prouty window display and thought I could do the bike ride and raise some money for research. I figured maybe I’d be able to raise $500. Before I knew it there was over $10,000 in donations for my efforts. The generosity of my friends, family, and colleagues has been nothing short of inspirational.

My favorite part of The Prouty is the spirit and enthusiasm of thousands of people coming together and knowing that they are making a difference. In a normal year my wife and I make The Prouty a special weekend away starting with Friday registration and a nice dinner out. Last year during the pandemic I challenged my donors by creating a custom ride for myself that added a mountain pass to the route for each of three major fundraising milestones. My family, friends, and colleagues contributed over $18,000, ensuring we would have to ride all three mountain passes with 7,450 vertical feet of climbing and winding 101 miles through the Vermont countryside!

Christine and Tedd Benson
Cyclist

Christine and Tedd Benson

Christine and Tedd Benson
Cyclist

Our first Prouty was inspired by Christine’s father, Jay Taft, who died of lung cancer in 2002. Jay had wanted to participate in a clinical trial offered. However, he didn’t qualify for it. We felt that it would honor him to support cancer research in this way. Over the years we have had other Beam Team members and company associates who have battled cancer, and we ride for all of them. Most recently we have lost a retired member of Bensonwood, Eric Gough, a passionate Beam Team biker, and we honor his memory through our efforts.

We got involved back in 2003. We had been biking enthusiasts for years at that point, but primarily off road/mountain biking. Distance road biking was a newly found passion in the early 2000’s. We liked that fundraising opportunities were available in the form of organized road rides for important causes and The Prouty was the one that piqued our interest. We’ve been hooked ever since.

There is so much to love about The Prouty! We love our weekly Beam Team training rides leading up to the event, the grand vision of The Prouty mission for advancing cancer research, and the generosity of donors from all over the world. It is so exciting and rewarding being part of such an immense and impactful event that truly makes a difference.

Tom O'Grady
Ultimate, Cyclist, Ultimate Committee Member

Tom O'Grady

Tom O'Grady
Ultimate, Cyclist, Ultimate Committee Member

I Prouty because the story of Audrey Prouty's courageous battle against cancer and the four nurses who cycled through White Mountains that first year in her memory is as powerful and inspirational today as it was in the early 1980s. Plus, I enjoy the camaraderie with Team Hoss and other participants. If the tables were reversed, and I was in as a cancer patient, I know this Prouty community would be out trying to help me.

My first Prouty was in 2008 when I met Doug and Leslie Lewis and the Team Hoss folks. Doug started Team Hoss to honor the memory of his brother, who died of cancer in 2005, and went by the nickname Hoss. Doug's generous and heartfelt spirit as well as that of team moved me to join a worthy cause and help those battling cancer.

My favorite part of The Prouty is riding with my Team Hoss teammates and talking with other riders along the way and hearing their stories. I love seeing the others at SAGs, the wind from the north when you turn at Wells River to head south back to the finish, and climbing Chieftain Hill on the second day of the Prouty Ultimate—and the chocolate milk afterwards.

I Prouty for family, friends, current patients, doctors, researchers, and my Team Hoss teammates.

Krysta Frye Kostrubiak
Walker, Cyclist, Volunteer

Krysta Frye Kostrubiak

Krysta Frye Kostrubiak
Walker, Cyclist, Volunteer

I Prouty for everyone affected by cancer. There are too many people to list, but I especially participate in honor of my mom, her mom, and the mama’s that inspired our team name, For The Mamas. This year I Prouty in memory of one of these special mamas. I also Prouty for friends who I watched struggle with the loss of a parent as we were growing up, those who survived cancer, those who currently have cancer, and those I have lost due to cancer.

My family has been a Prouty family most of my life! My mom got involved with the Steering Committee after losing her mom to cancer in 1995. My first Prouty memory was arriving when my mom was setting up registration at the Dartmouth Medical School in a little building known as the Pizza Hut. I did a Prouty walk with Sarah Meyers while my parents did a bike ride and then we all did lots of cleanup! I helped in the office as a Prouty intern as well supporting the event and entering in donations in the database.The Prouty brings people together to support a good cause. It is a fun and important community event that gives me a way to contribute to the fight against cancer.

The Prouty allows me to honor those around me who are struggling with cancers and those loved ones we have lost to cancer. It also allows me to contribute to the needs of cancer patients I don’t personally know, but who need support in their cancer journeys. The Prouty fuels ground-breaking research that benefits us all.

David Otto and Team Three Generations
Survivor, Ultimate, Cyclist

David Otto and Team Three Generations

David Otto and Team Three Generations
Survivor, Ultimate, Cyclist

Words from David Otto: Like so many others, we have had friends and family die from cancer, and many who have been successfully treated for cancer, including me and my wife. We are incredibly grateful for how successful doctors have become in managing these diseases, and we want to support the ongoing progress the Cancer Center is making.

I first rode The Prouty in 2006 at the urging of my son-in-law, Jeff Goodell. My wife, Mary, and daughter, Susan, also rode, as did six-year-old Eliza on a tag-a-long, and 9-year-old Carter on his own bike. We eventually decided on a name: Team Three Generations and the name continues. As time went on, Jeff suggested we ride 100 miles. With his encouragement, I trained, and we did it! Later, we stepped up to the Ultimate double century.

We Prouty because it is a great cause with terrific people and always a great biking experience for the whole family. It is easy to ask people to support The Prouty, and we are continually amazed at the generosity of supporters. We are proud to have raised between $25-30,000 annually for The Prouty to help support the Cancer Center. It is saving lives.

Patty Armstrong
Survivor, Walker, Volunteer

Patty Armstrong

Patty Armstrong
Survivor, Walker, Volunteer

As someone who has successfully (so far!) overcome several cancer diagnoses, I Prouty to support the research, treatment, and continuing care needed by all who face cancer or who have loved ones whom they support in that fight. It takes a broad array of medical expertise and a breadth of personal support systems to navigate those challenges.

The Prouty is an opportunity to change focus from what can be an isolating experience dealing with cancer challenges into celebrating with a community of inspiring people along the wide spectrum of the cancer treatment, recovery, and support process. The Prouty is my chance to reconnect with others to celebrate personal treatment successes as well as to remember and honor those we’ve lost.

My first Prouty was in the mid-2000’s with a group of fellow breast cancer survivors who I’d been gathering with regularly to support one another. That first year I walked as part of Team TGIF and helped in the volunteer tent. I've been an avid volunteer, helping a dedicated crew from Simple Energy set up and supply SAG stops, ever since!

I Prouty for those I love, the shared joy and commitment of our Prouty team, and to support the Cancer Center's invaluable resources. The Prouty represents the personal and the public hope I feel every day.

Kyle Koehler
Cyclist, Volunteer

Kyle Koehler

Kyle Koehler
Cyclist, Volunteer

I Prouty for everybody, and I Prouty because I like to help people. I'm always happy to jump in wherever I'm needed and I love seeing familiar faces each year at the event.

My first Prouty was in 2006 when I was 7-years-old and I biked 25 miles with my family. I did a few more bike rides (50 miles!) before I started volunteering—I’ve probably volunteered for about 10 years.

My favorite part of The Prouty is volunteering. I especially like working in the food tent where the action is! I also like the pre-Prouty and setting up the area to get ready for the event. The Prouty is a community effort and I'm proud to be a part of it.

The Judd Family
Volunteer, Rower, Walker

The Judd Family

The Judd Family
Volunteer, Rower, Walker

Words from Orrin Judd: My mother-in-law died of cancer a number of years ago and my sister was diagnosed with breast cancer two years ago. We Prouty for them.

Our oldest son did Hanover Crew and got us involved with The Prouty in 2012. He rowed and the rest of us walked with our dog. Five or six years ago, Bruce Bouchard and Prouty staff called King Arthur Baking Company looking for help with the Green Team—I’ve been a Green Team volunteer ever since. We have as many as 40 volunteers on the weekend of the event. The whole family pitches in, including my wife and daughter, who are willing to step in wherever they are needed.

My favorite part of The Prouty is that participants who are riding or walking are so humble that they say “thank you for volunteering.” I always tell them they did the hard part. Because volunteering prevents us from Prouty’ing on the day of the event, my wife and I walk the course on Sunday.

Nathan Roth
Golfer, Cyclist, Walker, Volunteer

Nathan Roth

Nathan Roth
Golfer, Cyclist, Walker, Volunteer

I have been participating in the Prouty for as long as I can remember. I Prouty for the cutting-edge research being done and hope that future generations won't have to experience the same hardships that cancer has brought upon my community. I Prouty for my grandfather, uncle, aunt, friends, and all those close to me and in my community who have been afflicted by cancer.

My first Prouty took place in a ride-along bike trailer pulled by my dad. I’ve been involved ever since either as a cyclist, walker, golfer, or volunteer and am proud to support the Cancer Center in honor of family members who have been impacted by cancer. I even worked in the Prouty office for a few summers as an intern helping in any way I could.

Community is my favorite part of The Prouty. What was started 40 years ago by a group of four nurses has become a major event that brings thousands of folks together from far and wide. Each person brings something special from their own community, but when you see everybody gathered on the field you know that they've come together to create a single community filled with hope.

Kevin Cotter, Susan Hanifin, & Family
Ultimate, Cyclist, Walker

Kevin Cotter, Susan Hanifin, & Family

Kevin Cotter, Susan Hanifin, & Family
Ultimate, Cyclist, Walker

Words from Kevin Cotter: We Prouty because we want to help others by supporting the Norris Cotton Cancer Center. Everyone needs to do his or her part to try to cure cancer. Cancer touches so many and devastates lives—not just the patient, but family and friends’ lives as well. It does not discriminate. Our family believes a cure is possible and we want to help.

I first participated in the Prouty in 2005 and got involved because some friends invited me to ride the 100 with them. In 2006 my sister-in-law died of breast cancer and the event took on a greater importance. Isla, Susan, Ashley and Henry began in 2007 when Isla, then age 5, made the decision she was going to ride 25 miles on her princess bike. Isla and I rode while Susan ran the 5K loop pushing the double stroller with Ashley and Henry on board.

We love the spirit of The Prouty, celebrations at Richmond Middle School, and crossing the balloon finish line on Saturday being greeted by volunteers, family and friends. It is a family event, with Kevin and Isla riding the Ultimate, Ashley joining for the century, and Henry and Susan running the 5k loop.

Words from Isla Cotter: Doing the Prouty has allowed me to feel as though I can accomplish anything I set my mind to. Sometimes as I’m biking uphill on mile 199, I curse my five-year-old self for involving me in the Prouty. More often, however, I thank her. Every summer, the Prouty teaches me that I can push myself beyond my perceived physical discomforts, and I have put those lessons to good use. I am frequently reminded that if I can I can ride 200 miles, I can do anything. Because of my experiences with the Prouty, I know I can overcome any discomfort—be it physical or mental—that stands in the way of changing our future.

Robin Henry
Volunteer

Robin Henry

Robin Henry
Volunteer

The spirit of The Prouty is so rich and fulfilling, and a cause close to my heart. Volunteering at the Prouty is one way I can help contribute and support the scientists, doctors, and team at the Cancer Center. It makes a difference.

I was dropping my son off to unload trucks for the Prouty back in 2006 and someone asked me if I wanted to help, too. They tossed me a t-shirt (with the classic BigHed design!) and I was in. I was more than willing to get involved and offer my time. I have manned the Information Tent for eleven years. It seems to be a good fit and I look forward to helping people in the tent every year.

My favorite part of The Prouty are the smiles. The happiness and the joy is absolutely infectious at the Prouty. There are hundreds of reasons why people participate and volunteer, some which are difficult and sad. Yet the smiles abound. I also love the early morning shift on Saturday of the Prouty—the quietness of the early morning and the wet dew accompany the dedicated walkers and bikers that peacefully start off on their journeys. It’s quite beautiful, especially knowing the hustle and bustle that builds throughout the day. It is a true community.

Marc Gaudette
Ultimate, Cyclist, FNCCC South Board Member, Volunteer

Marc Gaudette

Marc Gaudette
Ultimate, Cyclist, FNCCC South Board Member, Volunteer

We're all here for a short time, and life is precious. I feel duty and honor to contribute to the hopes of those in need. The money, time, and effort of The Prouty has given hope to so many.

I first participated in the Prouty in 2013, when my brother and I were talking about doing "something" to commemorate the 25th anniversary of my sister's passing, Liane Marie Gaudette, from leukemia in 1988. We were aware of other events but by mere chance my sister-in-law knew about the Prouty. Ironically in 2012 my brother Leo was diagnosed with lymphoma. That was the real impetus for us to organize a team. Happily, my brother is a survivor, as is my other brother and my father. In 2013 we formed The Flamingos as a group to participate in the Prouty.

For me the Prouty is really about the community and fellowship of human beings. From climbing the final hill, to senior citizens cheering you on in front of their residence, to crossing the finish line—it is emotionally overwhelming. Only true love can one-better that experience. But then again, I think this is true love in a different form.

I Prouty for all the people I know and those I don't know. Because, I can. I can't help but think it's not a matter of "if" but when for any of us. We can only hope and pray we never have to face that fight.

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